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Healthfully obsessed with dreams, time, music, memory, & love. patreon.com/jenmaidenberg

My writing is often about memory, dreams, perceptions of time, synchronicity, love & longing, healing, and music.

I edit two publications here on Medium: deja vu (literary essays and poems on time, memory, music, love, and longing) and woo woo (exploratory writing about dream life, waking life, psychic phenomena, and the nature of reality).

You can also find me at Patreon.com/jenmaidenberg (dream research and writing) and can drop me tips in my virtual tip jar at paypal.me/intothedream. …


The magic — and the danger — of looking for patterns in the world

Photo: VANDAL Photography/Getty Images

Last night, while searching “the significance of 38,” I landed on a Yahoo! Answers page. It was not the first time I’ve sought comfort in strangers’ answers to other strangers’ questions.

In fact, the most useful information I’ve obtained since the internet was usefully searchable has been from message boards, from people with questions professionals couldn’t answer or from people with questions for which there are no designated professionals. (This practice is so common now that, as I write this, there are 837 million search results for “My medical degree is from Google University.”)

The question I had last night…


But Might Work This Time

Photo by Garrhet Sampson on Unsplash

I love the term “creator economy.”

I don’t know who first coined this phrase, but kudos to them. As a marketing professional, I’m pretty critical when it comes to slogans and jargon. I’ve been naming products and businesses for 20+ years. It’s tough to come up with a new, original, descriptive, and memorable term or name. (Commercials for pharmaceuticals prove this point, while new car makes and models tend to disprove it.)

Despite the current well-deserved buzz for the creator economy, it’s not a new concept; the idea of artists, writers, musicians, and other creators trying to make money off…


A modern fable

Photo by Wil Stewart on Unsplash

It’s been a few months now I’ve been seeing Time. We started off as friends; although there was a bit of an imbalance between us. Time seemed to know so much more than I did. He was aware, for instance, of secret wisdom, passed down to him along a river where the pink salmon swim against the flow on purpose to make a point. Time could access the Past or the Future in ways I couldn’t. For me, Past was a memory and Future a dream. …


And It Took Time

Photo by Jen Maidenberg

It’s been about a decade that I’ve been actively researching and writing on the topic of love. Over the last few months, however, I finally discovered the solution to the elusive challenge of loving myself.

Time.

If you are someone who has done any personal development work, has ever had at least one therapy session, or sat for a yoga class, you must also be familiar with the phrase “self-love.”

I’ve had a lot of conversations with friends over the years about this phrase, about this idea of loving ourselves: is it right? Is it necessary? …


What Are We Willing to Call “Healing?”

Photo by RetroSupply on Unsplash

Who are the healing professionals in your life? Over the course of my own life, I would include the following without hesitation:

- Pediatrician

- Allergist

- Gastroenterologist

- Nurse practitioner

- Nurse midwife

- OB/GYN

- Dermatologist

- Psychiatrist

- Radiologist

- Chiropractor

- Reiki-master

- Acupuncturist

- Naturopathic Doctor

- Herbalist

- Yoga Teacher

- Psychic Massage Therapist

If you know me even a little, you know I am someone who extends the title “healing professional” broadly to include what’s considered by others to be more alternative therapies for diagnostics and care. …


It’s precisely this view we may miss the most someday

Photo by Jen Maidenberg

Last year, I moved into my mother’s house with my three teenage children. She had been considering downsizing and moving into a retirement community, and we had been homebound in our smallish apartment since the start of the pandemic. Buying it from her seemed like a boon for both of us.

This wasn’t my childhood home, but we had a connection to it nonetheless, as it’s the only place my mother lived throughout my children’s lives. We’d spent summers here in New Jersey while visiting the States when we lived overseas in Israel.

But this story is not about one…


Like everything else, it’s unhealthy when it becomes an obsession

If you have ever quit an addictive habit, substance, or relationship, you know what happens at some point: the fog starts to clear. Suddenly, and in only small ways at first, you see or experience the world differently.

In the case of removing chemical substances like cigarettes or sugar, there are often sensory indicators that you’ve changed. Maybe your clothes smell different, or the physical signs of cravings lessen or stop.

I quit something 19 days ago: journaling.

Nineteen days later, I’m not free or clear of withdrawal symptoms — I find myself bending the rules here and there, scribbling…


A micro poem about home

Photo by Jen Maidenberg

(after Painted from Memory after Cherry Hill after Hannaton)

This is how you find your way home:

  1. Get curious.
  2. Drop assumptions.
  3. Explore her hidden trails. Notice your surprise she has them and that they are lush. Sometimes, in winter, they are stark. This is beauty, too.
  4. Honor her for what she offers rather than what she lacks. Notice your surprise at how easy this is, especially when you listen west to the city and smell east to the shore.
  5. Tell everyone you know you were wrong about her, or at least not as right as you were once certain you…

Jen Maidenberg

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